Our lives as we know them have undoubtedly changed, and we all know that the COVID-19 has brought serious changes to the economy. Not only that, but it has also changed consumer behavior:

The way people buy, what they buy, and the mindset in which they buy have changed forever. These changes have now been confirmed by several studies, which also show that the pandemic is likely to permanently alter consumer behavior and bring about lasting structural changes in the consumer goods industry and retail sector.

This means that the way companies present their products and communicate with their customers will also have to change. What specifically has changed on the consumer side as a result of the crisis?

Closeness, trust & more solidarity 

Closeness and trust form the breeding ground for more mindful, social consumption and enjoyment behavior even after the crisis. The new solidarity that developed during the pandemic will shape trade and consumption in the future. This is also because a new level of solidarity emerged during the crisis, a new, self-confident “we” culture.

People helped each other, went shopping for at-risk groups, sewed mouth masks at home, and companies temporarily produced disinfectants instead of alcoholic beverages or perfumes. The pandemic makes it unmistakably clear that people cannot fight the virus and its consequences alone, but only as part of a group, as part of a society. In the future, consumer culture will focus less on goods, and more on resonant relationships.

Digitalization makes consumption more human

Technological innovations, automation, artificial intelligence and digital tools have shown their strengths in the crisis situation. They have not distanced people from one another; on the contrary, they help to be close to one another even at a distance – and also to organize consumption. Supply chains have been optimized in a very short time, Click & Collect saves time when shopping, and bicycle couriers will continue to provide local and fast last-mile delivery. Many will not want to miss the convenience of ordering food and groceries online and having them delivered, even after the crisis.

Naturally, people are spending more time with their digital devices during the crisis, whether smartphones, laptops or tablets, but also smartwatches. They use more streaming services, play games and communicate more with their smart speakers. People are spending much more time on social media, country specifically to varying degrees but on average social media usage has increased by about 45% globally as a result of the crisis. To stay relevant and satisfy consumer expectations, Nordics has largely focused on social media to keep a close connection with its fans. We’re stressing on useful insights about oral health, ecological consciousness and product reviews, so everybody’s well informed from a credible source.

How pandemics change consumer behavior permanently 

The pandemic is expected to permanently change consumer behavior. It will also have a lasting structural impact on the consumer goods and retail industries. These are the findings of management consultants Accenture in a recent survey the company conducted among more than 3,000 consumers in 15 countries on five continents. The Accenture survey was conducted between April 2 and April 6. At the time, many countries had already called for people to stay home.

The study concludes that consumer buying priorities were changing rapidly. For example, respondents said they were buying more personal care and cleaning products, as well as canned and fresh foods, than they were two weeks earlier. At the same time, they would buy fewer fashion and beauty items as well as consumer electronics. Data shows that 45% are making more sustainable choices when shopping and are likely to continue to do so, so it’s essential for companies to start rethinking and create more sustainable solutions or alternatives for their products.

Nordics’ all about sustainability.  However, we don’t compromise the hygiene standards especially at those difficult times: our toothpastes have a seal at the front, so the procust stays sterile until its first opening. Nordics mouthwash has a safety cap that must be pressed and twisted to open, and in addition is covered with a plastic sleeve. Our toothbrushes are safely sealed in vacuum bags and put in a cardboard box. That’s way we ensure that the quality that is produced in our labs is delivered on the shelves.

Availability is more important than brand loyalty 

Product availability was the most important thing to consumers at the onset of the pandemic. Empty shelves and temporary stock shortages greatly affected brand loyalty. Many consumers tried a different brand or shopped at a different retailer during the crisis. People tend to buy more at the same time and build stocks, not only for food but also for oral hygiene products.

A McKinsey study found that more than 75% of consumers tried new brands, shopping locations or shopping methods during the pandemic. Value, availability and quality or organic products were the main factors for consumers to try a different brand.

This trend is not new: even before the crisis, studies noted the development that consumers are much less loyal to brands these days and are increasingly trying out new products. This trend is particularly evident among the younger generations, because they love to try new things. The crisis has only reinforced this development and the positive experiences consumers have had during this time will continue to negatively influence their loyalty to brands.

What will consumer behavior look like after the pandemic? 

We can see that the crisis has brought some changes in the behavior of consumers, in all aspects of buying behavior, emotional attitude, daily challenges and basic needs of consumers:

  • People spend substantially more time online: social networks, platforms, apps, web
  • Consumers prefer digital communications and interactions: whether with people or machines
  • Consumers will shop online more, happily in groups: social shopping
  • Customers are becoming less trustful to brands: brand loyalty is waning
  • Consumers values in change: people are shopping more consciously and thinking about what is essential and what is frivolous. They value sustainability, regionality and quality.

Consuming for the sake of consuming will therefore fade into the background in the future. The pandemic freed consumption to some extent from its compensatory component: The function of the act of buying as a kind of act of frustration, which one practices primarily to feel less lonely or to reward oneself, is increasingly becoming a discontinued model. At Nordics, we will continue to keep on cutting-edge and meet future consumer demands with sustainable, organic products.