How Dental Care is Evolving with the Digital Age

Dentistry has been a critical part of our health for centuries. But with the advancement of technology, it’s evolving in ways we never thought possible. There are now new ways to keep your teeth and gums looking healthy that offer more convenience and comfort than ever before. From simple tools like toothbrushes to sophisticated digital toothpaste applicators, dentistry is becoming more personalized and accessible with every passing day. Here are some ways dental care is evolving with the digital age.

 How dental care is evolving with the digital age

In the past, people would visit their dentist to have a toothbrush or toothpaste applied. Today, it’s possible to get a custom-made app for your phone that will clean your teeth automatically.

One of the most popular new innovations in dental care is digital toothpaste applicators. These devices apply specific amounts of toothpaste with a consistent amount of pressure and speed for a consistent brushing experience. They also provide a timer so you know when to move on to another part of your mouth.

If you have braces, there are apps that can clean them for you with just one click! You simply attach your phone onto a holder that clips onto your braces and then select the appropriate mode from the app. It cleans off any food caught in between brackets while avoiding damage from metal bristles.

Even traditional tools like toothbrushes are evolving thanks to technology. There are now brushes on the market that track everything from brush time to where you need more attention, helping you achieve a healthy smile easily!

 The Future of Dentistry

 Brushing one's teeth is an experience. It's a time to relax, reflect on the day, or just enjoy oneself in general. But in the age of technology, this is changing.

With innovations like Bluetooth toothbrushes and digital toothpaste dispensers, brushing your teeth can be more about efficiency than enjoyment.

The toothbrush industry has been rapidly upgrading its products to make them more convenient for the average consumer. From self-cleaning brushes that recharge when they're finished brushing to electric toothbrushes that are able to brush two times faster than manual ones, there are plenty of ways we can make our oral care routine easier than ever before.

Digital technologies have also made it easier for dentists who want to offer more personalized treatment plans at their offices. With digital x-rays, dental impressions, and panoramic x-rays becoming more popular in the dental world, it's easier than ever for dentists to see your teeth and gums with stunning clarity—and help you better understand how you can enhance your dental care routine.

The Evolving Toothbrush

 The toothbrush has been a staple in households for a long time. We use them to keep our teeth and gums healthy, but they've also evolved into something more. Like so many devices nowadays, toothbrushes are getting smarter too.

In the 1980s the first electric toothbrush was released. These days, there are digital ones that track your brushing habits and offer helpful feedback on how well you are doing based on pressure and technique. They can even be paired with an app to show when you need to replace your brush head or repair your handle.

As technology continues to evolve, we'll likely see new innovations that will make brushing even easier and more efficient than ever before!

 The Evolving Toothpaste Tube

 We’ve all seen toothpaste tubes before, but not like this. One of the newest innovations is a digital tube that allows consumers to choose how much paste they want and dispense it with a click of a button. This offers two benefits: convenience and customization.

The most obvious benefit is the ease of use. The new digital tubes make it easier than ever to grab just the right amount of toothpaste, eliminating the risk of squeezing out more than you need or accidentally using too little. You can choose precisely how much paste you need depending on your brushing habits and dental needs.

The second benefit is customization. With the ability to choose your desired level of thickness, you can create a paste that caters exactly to your specific preferences in terms of thickness and texture. These changes are perfect for people who experience sensitivity in their teeth or gums or who have braces and want to avoid damaging their appliances with excess pressure while brushing.

 Conclusion

 So, what does all this mean for your dental care? It means that you are now able to take control of your dental health at home. Nordics products are designed with natural ingredients and cutting-edge technology to provide premium dental care at home. Our latest innovative product, the Kids Strawberry Splash Toothpaste contains the processed probiotic SymReboot OC, which sustains the oral cavity’s instinctive defenses and supports the healthy balance of the oral microbiome.

Learn more about how Nordics combines innovation and sustainable techniques to provide affordable and holistic dental protection here.

Sources:

https://www.adea.org/GoDental/Dental_Blogs/Words_From_Your_Peers/The_Future_of_Dental_Technology_and_Innovation.aspx


Dental Care Around the World

A healthy mouth equals a healthy body! Good oral health is often linked to overall wellbeing and optimum health. The dental specialists rightfully advocate the importance of proper oral care, because the mouth is the gateway to the rest of the body. An infection in the teeth and or gums, due to poor oral hygiene can compromise more organs such as the lungs, heart, and brain and cause severe and irreversible damage. This is why the presence of oral medical centers plays a significant role in the promotion of proper oral care. However, the people in need of dental treatments are less likely to have access to them for various reasons.

 The State of Oral Health Care worldwide

According to the World Health Organization WHO, roughly 15-20% of adults between the ages of 35 and 44 have advanced gum disease, while over 30% of adults worldwide between the ages of 65 and 74 have none of their natural teeth intact. Furthermore, the statistical evidence reveals that 60-90% of children and approximately 100% of adults in the world have dental cavities at least at one point in their lifetime.

 Tooth decay is the most commonly diagnosed dental disease in the world, affecting nearly 90% of the population. It's also the most prevalent childhood illness, afflicting more than 70% of school-aged children3. Oral hygiene habits among children from 41 countries demonstrate a variation in brushing frequency between North American and European countries, based on the most recent surveys. Reports by the American Dental Association (ADA) reveal that 78% of adults in the USA brush their teeth twice daily, while in the case of children only 44% of them do. European countries such as Switzerland, Sweden, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and Norway have the highest ranking in oral care, and specifically up to 75% of adults brush their teeth twice or more daily. Ranking lower in oral hygiene are countries like  Finland, Romania, Greece, Lithuania, Turkey, and Malta, where fewer than 46% of adults take good care of their teeth.

The skyrocketing rise of oral diseases is a major public health threat globally. Fortunately,  the Global Oral Health Programme, introduced by WHO, is drawing attention to the importance of oral health around the world. The objective of the program is to identify strategies to help the millions of people who are unable to receive preventative dental care due to a lack of financial resources or access. Several European countries have privatized oral health care services in recent years, making it unaffordable for many. Furthermore, most eastern European countries have stopped providing school dental services, leaving children without access to oral health care. Dealing with oral diseases effectively, to drive these percentages down, will require access to dental care products and dental treatments for everyone.

 

Oral care in Developed Countries

 The United States, Japan, and Canada are the top 3 countries with the highest number of hired dental professionals globally, indicating that developed countries have the best access to oral health care. Income levels play a significant part in determining good oral health. Since many health insurance policies do not cover dental care, middle-class families often struggle to afford the recommended twice-yearly checkups and necessary dental work.

 One thing worth noting is that, as research continues to uncover the many hazards associated with gum disease, the number of dental hygienists joining the industry has been increasing in all developed countries over the last decade. Between 1987 and 2006, the number of dental hygienists in Canada grew by 200%, whereas the number of dental hygienists in Italy increased by a stunning 2207%! The Bureau of Labor Statistics in the United States has predicted a 38% increase in job growth in the profession between 2010 and 2020, which is much higher than the average for all occupations. A rise in population, a larger need for preventative dental treatment, and the need to maintain oral health, by minimizing dental problems in the elderly population, are among the reasons for this considerable increase.

 Oral care in Developing Countries

On the contrary, the reality in developing nations is entirely different. For example, although tooth decay is very common in the developed world, it is surprisingly rare in African countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), this is primarily due to the scarcity of sugar in people's diets. A bacterial infection that affects impoverished children and destroys the soft and hard tissues of the oral cavity called Noma, is prevalent throughout the Sub-Saharan region in lieu of dental caries. As shown by studies, it may surpass death rates of HIV/AIDS and malaria in the upcoming decades. As a response to that, the International No-Noma Federation was established by a group of 30 foundations and non-governmental organizations. In Africa, a coordinated effort to address the disease includes village-specific awareness programs, malnutrition solutions, and increased surveillance. While prevention is vital, a treatment-based strategy involving dental surgery is frequently required but costly. Such programs rely on both private investments and a sufficient group of dental professionals.

 Conclusion

The reports show that dental health problems affect both the developed and the developing world. The first step to address them is the integration of oral health in the healthcare system, the appropriate distribution of medical staff across the world, and educational programs and campaigns for the low-income and high-risk populations. Spreading awareness will be a long process, but it starts with the preventative measures taken by individuals. The quality of life depends on personal hygiene, of which dental care should be an integral part.

  Sources:

 http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs318/en/

http://www.webdentistry.com/Article1421-fra.html

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Dental+hygiene+around+the+world%3a+present+and+future+considerations.-a0245543673

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm

http://www.who.int/oral_health/disease_burden/global/en/

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0022034515582062

http://www.nonoma.org/en/nos-activites/prevenir/